Appointment Despite Wealth

My understanding of appointment has always been that God chooses the least among us (from a human vantage point) to do the greatest work. As I was reviewing Stephen’s account of the history of Israel, I was struck by his characterization of Moses as seen by God.

Acts 7:20 At this time Moses was born; and he was beautiful in God’s sight.

In contrast with David’s upbringing as a shepherd who, similarly, was found to be “a man after God’s own heart”; Moses’ rearing was quite different.

Acts 7:22 And Moses was instructed in all the wisdom of the Egyptians, and he was mighty in his words and deeds.

Paul was actually raised with similar privilege. Although not royalty (or rather assimilation into royalty), as with Moses, he was taught by Gamaliel who was held to be one of the greatest teachers available for instruction within the Jewish community. This leads to two thoughts: favor and preparation.

God is omniscient (all-knowing). He’s also omnipresent (exists at all points in time simultaneously). He’s able to see directly into the heart of a man/woman and make a judgement call with all the facts. He was able to see how each of these men could be used for His glory despite any failures foreseen in their future. Money, wealth and privilege or the lack thereof are all just ingredients God is able to use.

The second part is preparation. When God appoints, he never fails to prepare. Each of the examples provided were prepared for their role in building the Kingdom of God. David was able to slay Goliath because he had been forced to defend his flock. Moses was granted access to Pharaoh when very few others were afforded the ability. Paul was largely responsible for apologetics (the defense of our faith) because he was so well-versed in scripture.

It certainly is awe-inspiring and comforting to know if God appoints, He’s faithful and more than able to back up the appointment with adequate preparation for the task-at-hand.

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